Scintillation Crystals

Inorganic

Offering an industry-leading variety of inorganic scintillating crystal materials for radiation detection and nuclear identification.

Why so many different scintillators? No perfect scintillator exists.  Different properties for different applications.

    The perfect scintillator should be dense, bright and fast.
    • Dense means high density and high atomic number ≳ 5 g/cm3, which increases the probability of a gamma-ray interaction.
      The denser the scintillator, the more efficient it is at stopping gamma rays.
    • Bright means more visible light is produced per unit energy absorbed  ≳ 30,000ph/MeV, which increases signal, reduces the statistical uncertainty in position and energy.
      The brighter the scintillator, the easier it is to pinpoint where in the scintillator the gamma-ray was stopped.
    • Fast means the scintillator creates the visible light in a short pulse ≲ 100 ns, which enables faster data acquisition rates, reduces the statistical uncertainty in position.
    Choices

    offer superior energy resolution, fast emission, excellent linearity and temperature stability.

    good light yield, combined with an emission wavelength that matches up well with PMTs, makes NaI(Tl) ideal for many applications.

    has the ability to detect Gamma radiation and Thermal Neutrons in a single crystal with exceptional PSD [FoM = 3.0].

    with dual gamma/neutron detection and an energy resolution near 4%

    ideal for applications that require higher throughput, better timing and energy resolution, including time-of-flight PET.

    for neutron activation analysis and active Compton shields

    very good stopping power, with good plastic mechanical properties and relatively good radiation hardness

    high light output and low afterglow for use with silicon photodiodes

    Physical Properties of Common Inorganic Scintillators
    S  cintillator Light yield (photons/keV) Light output (%) of NaI(Tl) bialkali pmt 1/e Decay time(ns) Wavelength of max emission lm(nm) Refractive index at lm Thickness to stop 50% of 662 keV photons (cm) Density g/cm3
    LaBr3(Ce+Sr) 73 190 25 385 ~2.0 1.8 5.08
    LaBr3(Ce) 63 165 16 380 ~1.9 1.8 5.08
    CLLB 43 115 180 /1100  420 ~1.85 2.2 4.2
    NaI(Tl) 38 100 250 415 1.85 2.5 3.67
    NaIL 35 100

    240, 1.4 μs
    230. 1.1μs

    419 1.85 2.5 3.67
    LYSO
    33 87      36 420 1.81 1.1 7.1
    CdWO4 12-15 30-50 14000 475 ~2.3 1

    7.9

    CsI(Tl) 54 45 1000 550 1.79 2 4.51
    CsI(Na) 41 85 630 420 1.84 2 4.51
    BGO 8 - 10 20 300 480 2.15 1 7.13
    CaF2(Eu) 19 50 940 435 1.47 2.9 3.18
    YAG(Ce) 8 15 70 550 1.82 2 4.55
    CsI(Pure) 2 4-6 16 315 1.95 2 4.51
    BaF2 1.8 3 0.6-0.8 220(195) 1.54 1.9 4.88
    10 16 630 310 1.50 1.9 4.88
    ZnS(Ag) ~50 130 110 450 2.36 -- 4.09
    The data presented are believed to be correct but are not guaranteed to be so.

     

    Brochures
    Scintillation-Materials-and-Assemblies.pdf

    basic properties of our radiation detection products and the mechanical features of various standard and specialty designs

    PDF | 6.27 MB
    Scintillation-Materials-and-Assemblies
    Data Sheets
    Physical Properties Chart

    Physical Properties of Common Inorganic Scintillators

    PDF | 301.43 KB
    Physical-Properties-of-Inorganic-Scintillators